"Glacier Girl" Flies Again, with Evans Coolant Onboard

Posted on by Mike Tourville

“Glacier Girl,” a WWII-era fighter plane that had been buried in ice for 50 years, was given new life, and a new coolant—Evans.

A Lockheed P-38F Lighting plane, Glacier Girl was intended to enter combat for the U.S. Army Air Forces but was forced to make an emergency landing on the ice fields of Greenland in 1942. The pilot was rescued but Glacier Girl was not recovered, and over the next 50 years became buried under more than 250 feet of snow and ice.

After extensive searches to find Glacier Girl and the other seven planes abandoned along with her, in 1992 the plane was recovered and transported to Kentucky, where it was restored to flying condition.

Glacier Girl was powered by two huge engines, and when restorers looked inside, they found crystallized regular engine coolant. To prevent corrosion, electrolysis, and other issues caused by regular 50/50 antifreeze, the restoration team decided to install Evans Waterless Coolant into the old machine, which was able to take to the skies again in October 2002.

Evans High Performance Coolant helps preserving the Glacier Girl and works great for other aviation applications.

Glacier Girl is now owned by Rodney Lewis, a pilot and the founder and CEO of the Lewis Energy Group, and appears in select air shows in the United States.